Fantastical 2.4 for Mac

Fantastical

Fantastical, the best Calendar app for any platform, just got a major update which added a few great new features.

From their blog:

You can now view, create, and edit attachments on iCloud and Exchange, as well as view attachments on Google Calendar.

[…]

One of our most requested features is finally here! Set and view travel time for events, and receive automatic time to leave notifications to ensure you get to your events on time.

[…]

If you use Fantastical in a corporate setting with shared calendars you’ve inevitably had the situation where a single event ends up duplicated across all of your shared calendars. Fantastical 2.4 will now automatically merge these duplicate events into a single event to reduce clutter.

[…]

Fantastical now has full undo and redo support for adding, editing, and deleting events and reminders. Did you accidentally reschedule an event and want to move it back? Just press command-Z and your event will get moved back to where it was.

There’s a whole slew of other updates, and now it’s a waiting game until they make it to the mobile versions, so if you haven’t already started using Fantastical now is a great time. Also, if you don’t you are a silly person.

Get it now from the Flexibits website or the App Store.

Sad face: Google discontinues the Nik Collection

Michael Zhang at Petapixel:

Google received praise from photographers last year when it made its $150 Nik Collection of popular photo editing software 100% free. But alas, all good things come to an end: Google has quietly announced that it will be abandoning the Nik Collection from here on out.

The announcement was made through a simple banner message found on the Nik Collection homepage.

This is a pretty sad day. I remember when Nik showed up on the scene. I was at a sales conference and they gave a 20 minutes presentation that at the 2 minute mark had the jaws of basically anyone who knew anything about photo editing on the floor. Later in the conference there was a trade show that lasted about half a day and it was sending room only at their booth from the moment it started until they kicked everyone out. This software was, at the time, fucking magic.

Most of its features have been rolled into, or copied by, other products now so it’s not really that surprising to see that they won’t be updating it anymore, but for those of you who are used to how easy it is to edit photos in apps like Instagram: understand that it wasn’t always like that, and that these tools are the ones that led the charge toward making things intuitive and easy.

The good news is that while they have now plans for future updates, you can still download the Nik Collection right now and keep using it. You should do so, in case they take them down for good.

The Disappearing Computer: Walt Mossberg’s final column

Walt Mossberg writing his final column:

This is my last weekly column for The Verge and Recode — the last weekly column I plan to write anywhere. I’ve been doing these almost every week since 1991, starting at the Wall Street Journal, and during that time, I’ve been fortunate enough to get to know the makers of the tech revolution, and to ruminate — and sometimes to fulminate — about their creations.

Now, as I prepare to retire at the end of that very long and world-changing stretch, it seems appropriate to ponder the sweep of consumer technology in that period, and what we can expect next.

Walt Mossberg is a titan in the field of tech journalism. Chances are you if you read about tech, you’ve read his work. This reflection on his career, and look forward, is a lovely last column to cap off his career.